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July 11 2011

05:41

20 Fresh Examples of Color Usage in Web Design

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Colors are very important to print, graphic and web design. Colors are actually important to everything, from spring to summer, clothes to balloons and so on. To show the power of colors we already showcased colorful websites here a few times, including a showcase published in March/2011 and October/2010. Today we gathered a new fresh round of websites using colorful elements to show you. From complete colorful layouts to discrete elements, you will see that colors can give your website a really neat look.

Typemedia 2011

colorsites

More Hazards More Heroes

colorsites

Into Brazil

colorsites

Radial

colorsites

CAU

colorsites

Girl Effect

colorsites

Goodfoot App

colorsites

egopop

colorsites

Bjarke Clauson-Kaas

colorsites

Zaarly

colorsites

Worry Free Labs

colorsites

ala

colorsites

5emegauche

colorsites

Pandr

colorsites

1minus1

colorsites

yurbuds

colorsites

Zeitgeistbot

colorsites

Shout Digital

colorsites

Theo Thermometer

colorsites

Red Pop

colorsites

Source:

The Best Designs
Site Inspire
Awwwards

June 27 2011

13:08

50 Minimalist And Stylish Free WordPress Themes

WordPress is the preferred content management system of many bloggers and internet marketers owing to many reasons. Out of them its easily available theme is the most important reason that can completely transform the look as well as the functionality of the website.

In order to let the content communicate with the visitors, bloggers tend to choose neat and clean minimalist WordPress theme. Such minimalist themes are best suited for those projects that demand simplicity. Furthermore, you can easily customize a minimalist WordPress theme based on your needs or requirements.

You’re in luck if you’ve been looking for some nice minimal WordPress themes. Here are 50 classy and free minimalist WordPress themes that you would find useful.

David Airey

( Demo | Download )

Cardeo Minimal

( Demo | Download )

Upstart Blogger Minim

( Demo | Download )

Release of Ambiru theme

( Demo | Download )

Ulap Theme

( Demo | Download )

Codium Extend

( Demo | Download )

Neoclassical

( Demo | Download )

Codium

( Demo | Download )

Melville

( Demo | Download )

Oulipo

( Demo | Download )

Sharpfolio

( Demo | Download )

SandDollar

( Demo | Download )

Revolutionary

( Demo | Download )

Just Lucid

( Demo | Download )

ulf pettersson

( Demo | Download )

The Essayist

( Demo | Download )

Textback

( Demo | Download )

THE JOURNALIST

( Demo | Download )

Blissful White

( Demo | Download )

Prototype

( Demo | Download )

SmartOne

( Demo | Download )

MINIMAL GUY

( Demo | Download )

Get Some Aparatus

( Demo | Download )

Shaken Grid

( Demo | Download )

Stilbruch Theme

( Demo | Download )

Satoshi

( Demo | Download )

The Standard

( Demo | Download )

Typogriph

( Demo | Download )

Doc Minimalist

( Demo | Download )

http://wp-content-themes.com/doc-a-free-minimal-wordpress-27-theme/257

Tarski

( Demo | Download )

AMY AND PINK

( Demo | Download )

Typo

( Demo | Download )

Neutica

( Demo | Download )

Wu Wei

( Demo | Download )

Inuit Types

( Demo | Download )

Sight

( Demo | Download )

Suburbia

( Demo | Download )

Blogum

( Demo | Download )

Paragrams

( Demo | Download )

The Daily Grind Minimal

( Demo | Download )

SimpleFolio

( Demo | Download )

Simple Organization

( Demo | Download )

My Themes

( Demo | Download )

Miniml Press

( Demo | Download )

Mnml Galleria

( Demo | Download )

Magazine Style

( Demo | Download )

zBench

( Demo | Download )

Liquorice

( Demo | Download )

LightWord

( Demo | Download )

Twenty Ten

( Demo | Download )

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04:52

June 17 2011

13:30

50 Useful And Free HTML Newsletter Templates

In email marketing, the design and layout of your newsletter plays an imperative role in the success of your marketing campaign. The design of your email newsletter can greatly determine how your campaign would attract the attention of your target market.

To further clarify this point, here we have gathered a list of some best HTML newsletter templates that are absolutely free to use. Hope this collection would be of some help for you. Share this with your friends and colleagues and let them know the power of an attractive newsletter design.

In the army now

( Download )

Fabric Template

( Download )

Outdoorsy Template

( Download )

Newism (Traveller)

( Download )

45royale

( Download )

ABC Newsletter

( Download )

Company Newsletter

( Download )

Very Helvetica

( Download )

High Impact

( Download )

ABC Widgets

( Download )

Meagan Fisher

( Download )

Vintage Theme

( Download )

Greenish

( Download )

Typographic

( Download )

Mike Kus

( Download )

Veerle Pieters

( Download )

Company Name

( Download )

Clouds Template

( Download )

Eco Letter

( Download )

Ecology

( Download )

Cosmetics Shop

( Download )

Man reading newspaper

( Download )

Party invitation

( Download )

Real Estate

( Download )

Day and Night

( Download )

Grapevine

( Download )

Diamond Watch

( Download )

Green peace

( Download )

Autosport

( Download )

Happy Easter

( Download )

Newsletter Template

( Download )

Newsletter Template

( Download )

2 Column, RSS Newsletter

( Download )

1 column, Skinny Format

( Download )

Tech Newsletter

( Download )

MetaLab Cool Template

( Download )

Free Newsletter Templates

( Download )

ABC Newsletter

( Download )

ABC Widgets

( Download )

ABC Widgets

( Download )

ABC Widgets

( Download )

Flowery Theme

( Download )

Green Newsletter theme

( Download )

Star Newsletter

( Download )

White and Red Theme

( Download )

Soft Theme

( Download )

Free Newsletter Template Sample

( Download )

Company Newsletter

( Download )

Free Newsletter Templates

( Download )

Free Newsletter Templates

( Download )

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June 13 2011

05:15

A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Advertisement in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design
 in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design  in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design  in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

There are many elements that make up any visual design, whether it’s good or not. Becoming familiar with the parts of a design is necessary before you can start to apply the principles of good design to your own work, in the same way that a doctor needs to have an understanding of anatomy before he can learn to heal a patient.

There are seven basic elements of any design. Some are easier to grasp than others, but all are important. Once you can identify the elements of a design, whether it’s your own or someone else’s, you can learn how the principles of good design are best applied.

Line

Lines are generally present throughout a design. They can be thick or thin, straight or curved, solid or dashed or dotted. Lines can be any color and any style. Straight lines are often used as delineations between sections of a design, or they may be used to direct a viewer’s vision in one direction or another.

The width of a line has a direct effect on its visual impact. Thick lines are bold and strong; they draw attention to themselves. Thin lines tend to do the opposite. Color also effects the impact of a line, with brighter and darker colors drawing more attention than lighter and paler colors. The style of a line also has an effect: dotted or dashed lines are less imposing than solid lines.

Curved lines often give a more dynamic or fluid look to a design. They indicate movement and energy. They’re also more common in designs with an organic nature, as they’re more likely to be seen in nature. Straight lines are more formal and structured, and indicative of “civilized” culture.

Examples

RePrint

RePrint uses a number of curved lines to direct the eye of the visitor.

Reprint in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

VideoDSLR

VideoDSLR uses straight lines of varying widths to delineate content sections.

Videodslr in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Justdot

Justdot is another example of a site that uses a lot of curved and dashed lines to indicate movement and energy.

Justdot in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Form

Forms are three-dimensional objects within a design, like a sphere or cube. You can have forms that are actually three-dimensional in your designs (like with product packaging), or forms that are actually two-dimensional but are displayed in a way as to imply that they’re three-dimensional (like a line-drawing of a cube).

Forms are common in actual three-dimensional graphic design, of course, but are also seen in web and print design. Website designs that use 3D techniques are making use of forms. Another common place to see forms is in logo designs where a sphere or cube is present.

Examples

Print Mor NYC

Print Mor NYC uses a 3D effect behind their main content.

Printmornyc in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Arlo Vance

Another example of a 3D effect in website design.

Arlovance in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Shape

Shapes are two-dimensional. Circles, squares, rectangles, triangles, and any other kind of polygon or abstract shape are included. Most designs include a variety of shapes, though deliberate use of specific shapes can give a design a certain mood or feeling.

For example, circles are often associated with movement, and also with organic and natural things. Squares are more often seen with orderly, structured designs. The color, style, and texture of a shape can make a huge difference in how it is perceived.

Examples

Method Design Lab

Method Design Lab uses ovals and other rounded shapes throughout their design.

Methoddesignlab in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Passion About Design

Circles are used throughout the design.

Passionaboutdesign in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Cappen

The Cappen site uses triangles throughout their site.

Cappen in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Texture

Textures are an important part of just about any design. Even designs that, on the surface, don’t seem to use textures actually are (“smooth” and “flat” are textures, too). Textures can add to the feeling and mood of a design, or they can take away.

The most commonly seen textures, apart from flat or smooth, are things like paper, stone, concrete, brick, fabric, and natural elements. Textures can be subtle or pronounced, used liberally or sparingly, depending on the individual design. But texture is an important aspect of design, that can have a surprising effect on how a design comes across.

Examples

The Heads of State

The Heads of State site uses a few subtle textures.

Theheadsofstate in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Doublenaut

Doublenaut uses a more pronounced texture in their background.

Doublenaut in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Cuban Council

The Cuban Council website uses textures on virtually every element of their design.

Cubancouncil in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Color

Color is often the most obvious thing about a design. We’re taught colors from an early age, and even go so far as to identify some things with color descriptors (“my green jacket” or “my red shoes”). Color is also capable of creating strong reactions among people, who consciously and subconsciously apply certain meanings or emotions to different colors (this is also influenced by culture, as many colors mean different things in different cultures).

Color theory is an important aspect of design, and something designers should at least have casual knowledge of. You should know the difference between a shade (when black is added to a pure color), tint (when white is added to a pure color) and tone (when gray is added to a pure color). You should also know terms like chroma, value, and hue. But more importantly, you should know how all these things work together to create a mood or feel in a design.

For a more complete overview of color theory, check out our archived series, Color Theory for Designers.

Examples

Go Live Button

The very bright colors used on the Go Live Button website have a definite impact on the perception of the visitor.

Golivebutton in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Camp David

The more muted colors here give a completely different feeling than the site above.

Campdavidfilm in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Old Putney Row to the Pole

The Old Putney Row to the Pole site uses darker but still muted colors, which gives yet another impression.

Rowtothepole in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Value

Value is closely related to color, but it’s more general. It’s how light or dark a specific design is. Again, this relates directly to the mood a piece gives. Darker designs convey a different feeling than lighter designs, even with all other design elements being equal. This is one reason you’ll often see designers releasing both light and dark versions of their themes.

Not every piece has a clear-cut value. With very colorful pieces, you might not really be able to tell how high or low the value is. One trick is to convert the design to grayscale, to get a better sense of how light or dark it is. You can also look at the histogram of an image to get an idea of where the value is more heavily concentrated.

Examples

This After That

This After That is an example of a site with a relatively light value.

Thisafterthat in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

The Lounge

The Lounge has a relatively dark value.

Thelounge in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Space

There are two kinds of space in design: positive space and negative space. Positive space is that which is occupied by design elements. Negative space (also called “white space”) is the area that’s left over. The relationship between positive and negative space has a strong influence on how the design is perceived. Lots of negative space can give a piece a light, open feeling. A lack of negative space can leave a design feeling cluttered and too busy, especially if the designer is careless.

Negative space can create its own shapes and forms, which impact the design. Understanding the effect of negative space and how to use it to your advantage in a design is one of the most important techniques a designer can learn, and can make the difference between a good design and a great design.

Examples

80/20 Studio

80/20 Studio has a lot of negative space in their design.

8020studio in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Dazed Digital

Dazed Digital, on the other hand, has very little white space in their design.

Dazeddigital in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Poster Roast

Another example of a site without a whole lot of negative space.

Posterroast in A Graphic Design Primer, Part 1: The Elements of a Design

Up Next…

In the next installment, I’ll be covering the principles that make up a good design, and how to apply them to the elements we covered here.

Further Resources

(rb)

May 20 2011

11:54

50 Fresh and Free WordPress 3 Series Compatible Themes

Being the most preferred Content Management System (CMS), WordPress is used by millions of users all over the world. It empowers bloggers and webmasters to effectively build blogs, websites and powerful online applications.

Since many people are using WordPress because of its ease of use and extensibility but sometime one or more WordPress websites look similar. This is the point where WordPress themes come in. Selecting a distinctive WordPress theme sets your website apart from others.

Recently WordPress has released WordPress 3 Series with loads of added features. So, next time when you update your WordPress theme, choose a WordPress 3.0 compatible theme. Here in this post we have gathered 50 outstanding WordPress 3 series compatible themes. All these themes are available for Free downloading.

Woody Magazine

( Demo | Download )

Swiss Theme

( Demo | Download )

New Event

( Demo | Download )

Computis Magazine

( Demo | Download )

Yellow Magazine

( Demo | Download )

Blog-O-Folio WordPress Theme

( Demo | Download )

Studio Theme

( Demo | Download )

Kalixo Magazine

( Demo | Download )

Grading Theme

( Demo | Download )

Vertical

( Demo | Download )

Bluecorp

( Demo | Download )

Money wp theme

( Demo | Download )

The Scoop

( Demo | Download )

Ashen wordpress theme

( Demo | Download )

Iris WordPress Theme

( Demo | Download )

Standstone wordpress theme

( Demo | Download )

ShopCart – Beauty Store

( Demo | Download )

Xenon Theme

( Demo | Download )

MusicShow

( Demo | Download )

FASHIONDESIGN

( Demo | Download )

My Recipe

( Demo | Download )

IMPRESSIVE

( Demo | Download )

Strategies Theme

( Demo | Download )

Night Spectrum

( Demo | Download )

BUSINESSFIRM

( Demo | Download )

Pretty Face Theme

( Demo | Download )

Palladiumize

( Demo | Download )

NATURA

( Demo | Download )

OnTheWay

( Demo | Download )

Silverine

( Demo | Download )

NEWSPOINT

( Demo | Download )

LODGE

( Demo | Download )

Effective Theme

( Demo | Download )

KARMELA

( Demo | Download )

Strontiumpon

( Demo | Download )

Zirconiumoid

( Demo | Download )

Refresh Theme

( Demo | Download )

Design Theme

( Demo | Download )

AutoFocus

( Demo | Download )

Revolt theme

( Demo | Download )

Minimal Theme

( Demo | Download )

Style Theme

( Demo | Download )

Spectacular

( Demo | Download )

Diary/Notebook

( Demo | Download )

Blogum

( Demo | Download )

Big Square

( Demo | Download )

Itheme2

( Demo | Download )

Cenutis Magazine

( Demo | Download )

Latest Tribuune

( Demo | Download )

Numerto Magazine

( Demo | Download )

Gamelison Magazine

( Demo | Download )

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May 04 2011

03:59

You Don’t Really Strike Me as an Arial: Selecting Font and Color for Your Words

Font, Color, Size – these are not decisions that should be taken lightly if you are interested in the full spectrum of meaning, innuendo, and even subliminal messages of your words on your website or blog. First and foremost, however, if readers can’t see your words properly the message you are sending is not being received at all, so the over-riding principle of font, color, and size selection must always be readability. Beyond that primary goal, it’s a worthwhile exercise to analyze the psychological meanings we send based on the font, color, and size of our copy and think about styling our words with our intended message in mind.

104654303

Font

My copywriter friend writes résumés for people on the side. Whenever we’re out she loves to watch people at the bar and determine what font their résumé should use. For Wall-Street-type women she goes for Didot and Wall Street guys Palatino with the headings in small caps. For the creatives it’s the suave Gil Sans, and computer geeks get Optima. For the purpose of her game she bases her choices on what she can tell by the look of the person, but she rarely meets her clients and sometimes never even speaks to them on the phone. In those cases she chooses the font based on the job the client wants to get.

For example, for a female client applying for both engineering and management jobs she went with Tahoma for the engineering res and the sophisticated Garamond for the other. For risk-takers she likes Verdana, but warns it takes up a lot of room so words must be chosen carefully and used sparingly. According to my friend only once has someone asked for a different font, so she feels strongly that there is an art to matching font with the message you’re sending potential employers or any other important reader. So do think twice before you send a project proposal in Chalkboard or Curlz.

Color

Pity the black screen with the rainbow-colored words. It just about breaks my heart. Not only is it virtually unreadable, but you half-expect a pixelated unicorn to come prancing across the screen. The concept of colors on your website is not that different from furnishing your favorite room in your house. If you’d like it to feel warm, inviting, and cheerful try yellows, reds, and orangesóas if your reader will want to cozy up to your fireplace and read your lively website or blog for hours. Dark purple and blues can lend a depth and seriousness to the mood. Greens are fresh, invigorating. Straw and tans convey earthiness. A deep hot pink grabs attention. For the words themselves, black text on a white background makes for the easiest reading. The brighter colors can always frame the writing or can be striking in smaller pops of color in logos or other graphics. For colored backgrounds and fonts, make sure the font color contrasts with the background color or the message you send is dazed and confused.

Size

Lots and lots of tiny print sends the message that you’re a crazy caffeinated blogger who has no filter on his thoughts and is trying to cram as much information and paranoid rants as possible in the available space. Or the message that this is a technical manual of some sort rather than information with a friendly and entertaining sensibility. Keep your words large and un-crowded enough to read clearly. If you have lots and lots of information to make room for, then take the opportunity to revise your copy until you can get your information down to more concise and reader-friendly nuggets. Leave enough white space on your page so readers can scan for main points. An engaged reader is best, but even a light scan is better than a quick click away from the page because of uninviting tiny crowded text.

Your aim is to present your message in a way that attracts the right reader for your site or blog. People spend a lot of time online, and they have a lot of choices. Font, color, and size can go a long way in creating the sort of online presence that is an attractive haven for your “type” of reader, whether she be Wall Street, fashionista, or computer geek. So think about what your message is, and style your words accordingly.

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You Don’t Really Strike Me as an Arial: Selecting Font and Color for Your Words

March 21 2011

12:06

Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Advertisement in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color
 in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color  in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color  in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

We’re designers, so it makes sense that a lot of us are visual learners and do better looking at charts and graphs than reading an article or listening to a podcast. Typography and color are two great topics that are perfectly suited for infographics, charts, and other graphical learning tools.

Below we’ve collected a good number of great infographics that will teach you how to use typefaces and colors effectively. There are guides for choosing a typeface, for combining typefaces, for figuring out what different colors mean in different cultures, and a lot more.

Typography

Dig into the history of typography and catch up on the typographic origins. Whether you need help choosing the right font or want to know how to effectively combine fonts, the graphics below can help, for both print and online design.

So You Need a Typeface
While at first this infographic appears to be a bit tongue-in-cheek, it’s actually quite useful. Start by choosing what type of project you’re working on, and then just answer a series of yes or no and good or bad questions to find a suitable typeface.

Soyouneedatypeface in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

The Anatomy of Typography
Understanding all the elements that make up a typeface is an important step in learning to expertly combine typefaces. This infographic breaks down the anatomy of individual characters within a typeface, covering everything from aperture to strokes to the different types of terminals.

Typography-is-known-for in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Periodic Table of Typefaces
The most popular fonts are graphically represented in the style of the periodic table of elements in this poster. It gives some brief history of each typeface (including the date it was first designed and who designed it), as well as the classificiation of each font. There are a number of different versions of the poster available for purchase, or you can print it yourself.

Periodic in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

The Evolution of Typography
This infographic showcases the changes in typographic design throughout history. It covers the evolution of serif typefaces and sans-serif typefaces, as well as a brief description of the history of script and blackletter typefaces.

Evolution in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Mixing Typefaces
This simple chart serves as a guide for combining twenty-two different common typefaces. It offers three separate classifications for determining whether two typefaces are compatible: “Combine at will”, “Not a conservative choice”, and “Think again.”

Mixingtypefaces in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

19 Top Fonts in 19 Top Combinations
This great chart provides an instant visual reference to good combinations of popular fonts, including Helvetica, Garamond, Gill Sans, Minion, and more.

19topfontscombinations in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Type Palettes
Graphical representations of typography combos are a great way to see how different fonts work together. This Type Palettes article shows a number of complex typography combinations, using different typefaces for headlines, subheadings, text and captions.

Typepalettes in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Most Popular Fonts by Operating System
Not everyone is using @font-face for their website designs yet. And even those who are need a backup for older browsers (or in case their font service is down or unavailable). This chart shows all the most popular typefaces by operating system, and even includes the most commonly used fonts from Google Font Directory and FontSpring.

Fontbyos in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

34 Typographic Sins
There are dozens of mistakes commonly made in typographic layouts. This poster details thirty-four of them, as well as what the correct usage is.

Sins in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Color

Color science and theory is a remarkably complex field. The graphics included below, though, can offer valuable insight into the world of color, including how to effectively create color palettes and what colors mean.

Basic Color Relationships
This infographic gives all the basic information you need to know about color theory. It includes terms, the way RGB and CMYK work, and meanings of different colors, as well as a color wheel the illustrates warm and cool colors.

Ctheory in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

What Colors Mean to Different Cultures
When designing for an international audience, it’s important to note the effect your color scheme will convey to your audience. This handy chart shows exactly what different colors mean in different countries, helping to prevent any cultural faux pas.

Culture in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

How Color Effects Purchasing Decisions
If you’re designing an ecommerce site, it’s important to know exactly how different colors affect purchasing decisions made by your visitors. This chart shows the effects different colors have on those purchasing decisions, as well as which colors work bets for which types of buyers.

Purchasing in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Colors of the Most Powerful Brands in the World
Certain colors have become associated with certain brands, both in the “real world” and online. This series of graphics explores the colors used in the various design schemes and logos of the biggest brands in the world. Each of these graphics explores a different aspect of the use of color in branding.

Powerful in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Colors of Twitter Profiles
This infographic compares the use of colors by geography, keyword, and demographic of Twitter users who have used the Colourlovers Themeleon Twitter profile designer. It also showcases the most colorful Twitter personalities, and the colors they use.

Twitter in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

What Your Web Design Says About You
This infographic showcases the most popular color, typography, and other design options in web design are most popular, and what the different choices say about the site itself. The graph also delves into color science and theory, with interesting graphics representing each hue.

What-your-web-design-says-about-you in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Top Voted Colors of 2010
Staying current on trends in color is important for designing a site that looks current (or stays timeless). This infographics shows the results of a survey of over 1000 people chose the most popular colors of 2010 and the words that the colors represent.

Color2010 in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

His and Hers Color Names
A useful, interactive infographic that displays the results of XKCD’s color survey, which used five million plus samples to judge what men and women consider accurate names for all the colors of the spectrum. Some are downright hilarious, while others are incredibly creative. In either case, it gives a good indication of how the sexes feel about different colors across the spectrum.

Hisnhers in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

The Color Strata
Here’s another visualization of the XKCD Color Survey dataset, broken down into the 200 most common color names. The format used here is really interesting, and not something commonly seen.

Strata in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Recognizing Brands by Color Scheme
An interesting study that seeks to simplify brand logos by breaking it down into it’s basic color and circles to represent text and lines. A useful way to see where the color scheme of a logo works it’s magic, which can help you design color schemes with more impact.

Basic in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Useful Infographics

Why Does Gen Y Buy
This infographic is useful to anyone creating an ecommerce site that’s aimed at Generation Y, who spend about $20 billion online each year.

Genybuy in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Interesting Facts and History of CSS
This infographic combines the history of CSS with a number of interesting facts about it. It includes the different versions of CSS, as well as support by different browsers.

Interesting-facts-and-history-of-css in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

WTF is HTML5 and Why We Should All Care
This is a brilliant infographic that shows what new features HTML5 has added, and what those features mean for the future of the internet.

Html5 in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

User Centered Design
This infographic breaks down the elements of user-centered design, as well as the process of creating such designs.

Usercentereddesign in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

HTML5 & CSS3 Readiness
This interactive infographic breaks down exactly which browsers support which new features of HTML5 and CSS3.

Html5css3readiness in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

The Visual FAQ of SEO
This infographic gives a great breakdown of what you need to know about search engine optimization. It covers things like site architecture and structure, link building, and SEO tactics.

Visualfaqseo in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

The State of Web Development 2010
Here’s a great rundown of the state of web development in 2010, including the popular browsers (desktop and mobile), OSs, and more.

Webdevelopment2010 in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Bounce Rate Demystified
This infographic from KISSmetrics showcases how bounce rate statistics work, and how they’re calculated.

Bounceratedemystified in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

The Anatomy of a WordPress Theme
This is an incredibly useful infographic that breaks down the parts of a WordPress theme in great detail. If you’re a theme developer (or want to be), it can also serve as an excellent quick-reference guide.

Anatomyofawptheme in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

The Anatomy of a Perfect Landing Page
The creation of a great landing page is equal parts art and science. This infographic breaks down exactly what goes into a great landing page.

Perfectlandingpage in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Interesting Infographics

Salaries in the Realm of Design
This infographic compares the salaries of different design professions in the United States, India, and the UK. It also covers salaries by country depending on the type of employer (Company, College, Non-Profit, etc.).

Salariesindesign in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Through the Generations: How the Web is Being Used
This infographic breaks down common internet usage patterns among different generations, including Millenials, Gen X, GI Generation, Silent Generation, and the Boomers.

Throughthegenerations in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

The Awesome Evolution of the Internet
This is a fun infographic that breaks down the evolution of internet users from the beginning of the web.

Evolutionoftheinternet in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

The History and Present State of Domain Names
Ever wondered what the evolution of domain names looks like? This infographic breaks it down from the first .net domain name in 1985 through now.

Domainnames in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

The Evolution of the Blogger
An interesting infographic that shows the evolution of bloggers from those keeping online diaries to company bloggers, vloggers, and others.

Evolutionoftheblogger in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

The Power of WordPress
This infographic showcases the power of WordPress as both a CMS and a blogging platform. It includes a timeline of WordPress from May 2003 through September 2010, as well as details on the types of sites using WP and daily user activity.

Powerofwordpress in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Multiple Identities
This infographic discusses what profiles users utilize to sign up for and use different services across the internet, including Google, Facebook and Twitter.

Multipleidentities in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

The Internet in 2020
Here’s a great graphical representation of what the internet is predicted to look like in 2020, based on current data. It covers how many people will likely be online, who those people will be, and more.

Internetin2020 in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Origin of Important Typefaces
This infographic shows a timeline of when important typefaces were developed and by whom.

Typefaces in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Just How Massive is Google, Anyway?
Figuring out just how big Google is can be tricky. This infographic sheds some light on the subject.

Massivegoogle in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

The History of Programming Languages
This infographic from O’Reilly shows the history of various programming languages, from 1954 until 2004.

Programminglanguages in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

Dribble: What Is It Used For?
An interactive HTML5 infographic that offers details about Dribble usage and users.

Dribble-pie-chart in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

The World of Data We’re Creating on the Internet
This infographic from Good Magazine shows how we use the internet and the data people create on a daily basis, including email, video, and other content.

Datacreation in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

The Brads – Learning About Contrast in Design
Contrast is a very important concept designers need to grasp if they want to be successful. This infographic/comic strip from Vectortuts+ explains contrast in an easy-to-understand way.

Contrastindesign in Design Charts for Better Typography and Color

(ik)

05:28

30 Excellent Examples of Color Usage in Web Design

Choosing the right color scheme for a web design is extremely important. It will set the mood of your design probably more so than any other component. Sometimes it’s appropriate to go big with an assortment of bold colors, while other times it’s better to play it safe with a minimal color palette. For today’s inspiration, we’ve gathered 30 web designs that make excellent use of color. Enjoy!

Netlife Research

colorful01

Collision

colorful02

Instagallery

colorful03

FIFe

colorful04

The Material Group

colorful05

WVA 2011

colorful06

Orange Sprocket

colorful07

Co Exhibitions

colorful08

Spoon

colorful09

Gerren Lamson

colorful10

Yuna

colorful11

rec beat

colorful12

Assistly

colorful13

Love of my Life

colorful14

Aiala Garcia

colorful15

Elliot Lepers

colorful16

Polyester

colorful17

The Daily App

colorful18

Keenan Wells

colorful19

thoughtboxes

colorful20

girlondon

colorful21

Fhoke

colorful22

AWP Express

colorful23

Marie Catrib’s

colorful24

3 Sided Cube

colorful25

Jeremy Church

colorful26

Sparkbox

colorful27

moovents

colorful28

Biola Undergrad

colorful29

best app ideas

colorful30

Source:

The Best Designs
Sites of the Week – Abduzeedo

March 16 2011

15:59

ColorSnapper: The missing color picker for the Mac

Finally! I’ve been waiting for something like this for a while now. ColorSnapper is a tool for quickly finding out the color of any pixel on the screen. Activate it with a hot key and it automatically saves the color value to your clipboard.

13:50

The Art of Painting in Water

Suminagashi is the ancient Japanese technique of painting on water to create marbleized effects on paper. Literally, it means “ink-floating”, which is in reference to the Sumi-e inks that were originally used in the technique. The patterns are the result of color floated on either plain water or a viscous solution, and then carefully transferred [...]

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Tags: Color

March 03 2011

17:43

The Inevitable Importance of Colors in Design

As a designer, you should remember that every little thing matters to make your design perfect. Colors are also an important part of any designing hence one cannot ignore the importance and the effects it can bring to your entire design.

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Tags: Color

February 22 2011

13:51

45 Free And High Quality (X)HTML/CSS Website Templates

Design templates come handy when you need to create a good web design in the shortest possible time. This is the reason why these design templates have become the latest trend of the designing arena.

With the passage of time different techniques have been used in the web design that arise the need to be up-to-date with the latest technique in use. These days, CSS and XHTML is the popular web design trends which have been followed world over.

In this post, we have collected a comprehensive assortment of Free CSS and XHTML Web Layouts that you can download for your use. These design templates not only give you inspiration but also let you get back to your creative track.

Feel free to share your opinion with the designing community. Comments are welcomed!

CreativeStudio

( Demo | Download )

CSS heaven

( Demo | Download )

Darkness

( Demo | Download )

Coffee Maker

( Demo | Download )

Free Flowers Website Template

( Demo | Download )

CSS Heaven 1

( Demo | Download )

Photomatic

( Demo | Download )

2 Breed

( Demo | Download )

Retro Car

( Demo | Download )

Grunge Template

( Demo | Download )

Darkportfolio

( Demo | Download )

FIVE STAR

( Demo | Download )

Acallia

( Demo | Download )

CleanBusiness

( Demo | Download )

Coffee

( Demo | Download )

Shop Around

( Demo | Download )

Gallerised

( Demo | Download )

GrayCompany

( Demo | Download )

MovieHunter

( Demo | Download )

Blogger

( Demo | Download )

Magicbox

( Demo | Download )

Pure Elegance

( Demo | Download )

Corporate Blue

( Demo | Download )

Newserific

( Demo | Download )

Speed Racing

( Demo | Download )

Buzz

( Demo | Download )

Photo Pro css template

( Demo | Download )

Prestigious

( Demo | Download )

Dapurkue E-Commerce Template

( Demo | Download )

Organic Farm

( Demo | Download )

960.GS CSS Photography Template

( Demo | Download )

Portfolio

( Demo | Download )

High Technologies

( Demo | Download )

BusinessTemplate

( Demo | Download )

Restaurant Website

( Demo | Download )

LifeBook

( Demo | Download )

Motor Club

( Demo | Download )

Green Planet

( Demo | Download )

Symisun

( Demo | Download )

Feel the music

( Demo | Download )

Real Estate Grey

( Demo | Download )

Biz Company

( Demo | Download )

Nowhere

( Demo | Download )

Featuring

( Demo | Download )

Small Window

( Demo | Download )

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05:53

What Does Your Business Card Say About Your Brand?

Business cards are often overlooked or tucked away for later. But when properly done, a business card is the first thing potential clients will look at after meeting you. It will identify your business, and provide a way to get in touch – which makes your card an essential part of your brand. The design, the message, the ‘feel’ of your card – these are all clear signals to your new clients that will help them work out who you are and what you stand for. A clean, simple design suggests you care about appearance – while a cluttered, over complex card might scare people away.

200395275-001

So how do you communicate everything about your brand on a simple business card?

Content

The main reason you hand your card out is to be contacted, so don’t hide your details with cluttered design and unnecessary text. Your card is always one glance away from ending up in a pile with all the others, so communicate your USP as simply, and memorably as possible. What makes your brand stand out from the crowd?

Design

If your design looks amateurish, then so will your business. Highly detailed and complex designs don’t scale well and lose detail when printed (particularly for logos). You need to find that vital balance between design and content, with some space for people to write additional notes on your card.

Typography

Legibility is essential, but it’s the font that helps depict personality! The right font sets the tone, speaks in the voice of your brand, and expresses your style. Remember, a fun or modern font may end up undermining a ‘serious’ business such as a law firm or accountancy (let’s not even mention Comic Sans!).

Colour

It may sound odd, but colours are imbued with relationships and meanings. If you choose a colour that matches your message, you’ll find our card unconsciously communicates what you want to say.

Print Quality

A professional business should look just that – professional. Low print quality can be disastrous for the look and ‘feel’ of the card. If you offer a high quality product or service, don’t be let down by poor quality print just to save a few bucks. After all, what does that tell people about your brand?

Paper / Material

Whether you like it or not, the quality of the paper you use says something about your brand. Cheap, thin paper can give the wrong impression. Touch is an important sense, and cheap, thin paper never feels good. If you choose plastic or metal instead, think carefully – a rigid card may suggest a similar trait in you or your business.

Size

As everyone knows, size matters – so choose yours wisely! Smaller business cards can be perceived as cool, innovative or cute while really large sizes might help you stand out! But would a small, funky card suit a very corporate brand? And would an oversized card get thrown away because it doesn’t fit neatly into a wallet.
So before designing and printing your business cards, consider some of these points. What do you want your business cards to truly say about you and your brand? If you get it just right, you’re much more likely to get that all-important first phone call.

Have we missed anything? What other factors do you think affect the initial perception of your brand?

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What Does Your Business Card Say About Your Brand?

February 14 2011

11:00

Look Under The Hood: Photoshop Color Settings

Color settings are often skipped by self taught Photoshop users and usually people can get away without any knowledge of them. So should you bother getting familiar with them?

The real question is – how serious are you about your work? If the answer is anything else then “not at all”, then any additional knowledge benefits you. Basic knowledge of the options here can make your life much easier at some points. Your designs will probably be displayed in multiple places in various shapes and forms, therefore you might want to make sure, that they look they way you intended them to look. The following article will give you a helping hand in achieving that goal.

Let me start off by telling you, that the purpose of this article is not to give you a long and probably boring explanation of all the options and their respective descriptions, but to give you enough knowledge so that you know what you’re doing.

Let’s begin with localizing the Color Profiles option.
You can access them from the Photoshop menu Edit -> Color Settings or by using the shortcut CTRL+Shift+K .

The following window should come up:

The default settings most often look something like that. So let’s go through with what is what in here.

Working Spaces


RGB
RGB colors are mixed and created in the way monitors use. Therefore RGB is perfect for screen design.

You probably will have the sRGB IEC option set here by default. It’s fine for consumer purposes, but does not give you a very rich color palette. It would be a good idea, especially for web designers and photographers to go with Adobe RGB (1998) which offers a wider color range as more colors is what we all want. Don’t go panicking if you’ve been designing in sRGB, the difference is not that big, but this profile is created for the less expensive displays.
More and more photographers tend to use another option, the ProPhoto RGB. It has a much broader color range, some of it actually being outside of human vision. Working with that profile however has it’s cons, one of them is the fact that converting the color scale to a lower one on images created in using this color profile may lead to unwanted results. So before you choose to go with that one you might want to get some additional knowledge on working with ProPhoto RGB.

Also – don’t confuse the sRGB IEC with Monitor sRGB IEC , if you chose the second you might get varying results on different displays.

A big number of desktop printers use RGB values when printing, not CMYK. So have that in mind as well.

CMYK
CMYK in turn replicates the way of mixing colors that big printers use. If you’re designing something with the intent of publishing outside of the screen you should make sure that it looks correct in CMYK Color Profile.

You will want to leave this option here at it’s default place at U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2 . If you have the possibility of asking for the CMYK Color Settings file of the printer you will use, do so by all means. With that in mind just choose the “Load CMYK” option from the menu and you’re good to go.

Gray / Spot
Leave those at Dot Gain 20%


Color Management Policies

All the values here are the same for all three options, so let’s see what they do.

Off
If you choose to turn off the Color Management Policies the files you create will not have the *ICC profiles embedded in them. That may cause your files to vary in color on different displays. It’s generally recommended that you leave it on.

Preserve Embedded Profiles
This option will leave the ICC profiles of the files you open. In case you open a file which does not have an ICC profile, it will use your current settings to temporarily embed one. However it will not save the Color Profile to the file.
All new files you create will be saved with your current Working Spaces settings. You can change them in the advanced settings, when you create a new file.

With this option on, you can have multiple files with different color profiles opened at the same time. Photoshop will treat every one of them separately.

Convert
This will convert the ICC values of the file you open to your Working Space settings. However if your file had no ICC profile to begin with, it will remain that way. The new files you create will inherit the values from Working Space settings.

*In color management, an ICC profile is a set of data that characterizes a color input or output device, or a color space, according to standards promulgated by the International Color Consortium (ICC)
Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICC_profile


Conversion Options


Click the “More Options” button. New fields will appear.

Engine
Adobe (ACE) uses the Adobe Color management system and color engine. In most cases you want to stick with this one, as it’s values remain the same across the platforms.

Intent
This specifies the method used to convert color between spaces. The most common used options here are Perceptual and Relative Colorimetric.

Relative Colorimetric – takes only the colors which are out of gamut and converts them. All the remaining colors are left intact, which may result in some color changes on your design.
Perceptual – intent will map all the colors to the closest in-gamut color. By taking all the colors during the process the result should be visually more close to your original design. Your gradients and such will display best with this setting.

Use Black Point Compensation
Better to leave on. If you choose to turn it off, it can have an effect on dark spaces in your design, sometimes with a very negative on your project.
This options ensures that dark spaces in your file are mapped to the closest dark range of the destination space.

Proof Setup


Proof setup goes hand in hand with Color Settings. You will find this option under View -> Proof Setup.

It’s purpose is to make your display simulate print or other Color Profiles. The hot key to turning it on and off is CTRL+Y. If your colors are strange, you might want to check if you accidentally didn’t turn this feature on. If on the end of your file name there is a backslash with a Color Profile, then you have your culprit.

In the Proof Setup menu you have different preview options.

Working CMYK will simulate the CMYK values you chose in the Color Settings, so you have a quick preview of how your file will look like after print. Why just not convert the image to CMYK all together? Doing that will lock you out of some options and filters Photoshop has. So you sometimes might want to wait and convert from RGB to CMYK until later.

The neighboring options do pretty much the same, but with one plate at a time.

Mac / Win RGB here you can simulate a Mac or Windows display. Can come quite helpful when you’re designing for cross platform purposes.

Custom - if you choose the custom option the following window appears.

Here you can create an additional profile for the proof simulation. The first two options we went through before.

Simulate Paper Color will do as it says – simulate the white shades of white of paper on the screen.
Simulate Black Ink will show you how dark your dark places will be when created with printer ink.

Managing Color Profiles

Check the files ICC Profile
So now that you know how to customize them, you might want to know where to find out what profile is embedded in the file you have opened. You can find that out in the lower left corner of Photoshop. There is a small bar displaying various information, what you want to do, is to click the right arrow and from the menu choose Document Profile, this will display the ICC profile information you seek.

Assigning / Converting Color Profiles
To assign or convert the color profile on the file. You want to go to your top menu and choose Edit -> Assign Profile / Convert to Profile.

That’s basically it. Now you should have the basic understanding of how Color Settings work and how to manage them in your work.

January 27 2011

10:00

Please All Types of Clients: Guide to Choosing Color Combinations

Every graphic designer knows that choosing the color combinations is among the most important parts of the design making process, on print or on the web. There is no universal color combination that will please all types of clients. For some designers, it is a matter of trial and error. But trial and error means you wasting plenty of precious time. Time is an important commodity in the graphic designer’s fast paced world. Through proper research, sense of style and good common sense, you can eliminate the long time of experimentation.

Understanding the Color Wheel

Before anything, it’s important to know the basics of the Color Wheel first. Every designer should by now have familiarized the color wheel by heart.

White light is a combination of all the colors of the spectrum, divided into three basic groups: red, blue and yellow. From these three colors, you can combine every color imaginable to the human eye. To be able to create aesthetically pleasing color combinations, you have to know how the color wheel first. I’ll try explaining it to you without being too technical.

Monochromatic

For the monochromatic color scheme, it makes use of one color of different shades. For example, you use the following color combination for a web site:

The main color here is green, plus a lighter (50% white) green and a darker (50% black) green. Using monochromatic color combinations add a professional and sophisticated. It’s no fuss and straight to the point–thus it can get boring and monotonous (they have the same prefix, so…).

Complementary

The most interesting color combinations are those that show contrast and interest. This is by combining colors that are located opposite each other in the color wheel. They are bold, visually interesting and appealing. Just be sure to combine colors that look great together for your client’s company. Some combinations may look too gaudy–stay away from that.

Analogous

The analogous color scheme combines colors next to each other on the color wheel. They’re like the monochromatic scheme, great for professional and business uses. They are more interesting since they add contrast and interest into the canvas. Analogous color schemes are easy to work with and they always look great.

Here are some great examples of analogous color combinations:

Triadic

Triadic color schemes take three colors that are equally apart on the color wheel. They create a triangular shape when you connect the colors together. This type of color combination is aesthetically pleasing and well balanced.

Pleasing Clients with the Right Color Combinations

As mentioned earlier, you cannot please all clients with a universal color palette. You should know your client’s company first and foremost–what the company and their products are about, so that you can have a head start on picking the colors. Don’t forget to also check out successful logo redesigns.

Restaurants, Fast Food and Food Products

For companies that are centered on food and dining, use red and yellow a lot. These colors are attractive and easy to spot. Warm hues and solid colors are recommended. This is because the color red and yellow induces hunger by speeding up metabolism. This will increase the diner’s appetite, making them order more food than they should have. Avoid the blue and purple color for restaurants at all costs–these colors decreases one’s appetites. Subconsciously, our body reacts negatively to blue and purple toxins. Green and brown is a good color for relaxing and casual eating (think cafes and bistros). Try using colors in the triadic or complementary color scheme.

Here are some interesting color palettes for restaurants, fast food and food products:

Makeup and Hygiene Products

Choose colors that convey femininity, grace and cleanliness. Light, pastel colors like white, lavenders, light blues and light pinks are a great choice. Avoid warm and harsh colors. You can also opt for monochromatic and neutral colors, for they signify cleanliness and simplicity. Here are some interesting color palettes for makeup and hygiene products:


Government Agencies, Public Offices, NGOs and Organizations

When creating something for government and public agencies or organizations, keep in mind that it should appear respectable, trustworthy and dignified. Choose colors that are positive and cool, such as greens and blues. These cool colors provide a positive, public image that’s solid and built on trust. Government and NGOs love using reds, whites and blues for their logos after the US American flag. These colors are also a sign of nationalism and integrity.Choose the monochromatic or analogous color scheme. Minimize on using contrasting colors.

Here are some interesting color palettes for public offices, government agencies and other organizations:

Logos or graphic design for educational establishments, insurance companies and hospitals also apply as well.

Hotels, Spas and other Hospitality Establishments

When designing for hotels, spas and resorts, capitalize on comfort, hospitality and relaxation. Choose ‘earthy’ and natural colors. Browns, blues and greens are the most relaxing and calming colors. Avoid bold colors. Make use of the monochromatic color scheme. Use colors only to a minimum, unless if it’s a Vegas establishment.

Blacks, whites, silver and gold are also a good choice of colors for hotels, spas and resorts, especially if it’s a five-star establishment and they wish to capitalize on luxury and class.

Conclusion

Color is a good way to catch the eye of viewers, but too much color will be distract your readers from looking closer and reading on. If you can, stick to 2 to 4 colors only.

Color combinations are not created on whim, but through careful research and study. By knowing the basics of the color wheel and combinations, you can create thousands of aesthetically pleasing color combinations.

Reposted byfish2000 fish2000

December 23 2010

17:11

The Best Premium-Like Free WordPress Themes Of 2010

December is going to be over with the end of 2010. We are ongoing end of the year roundup in this month. We have already compiled some posts in this series like Best Icon Sets from 2010, Best Photoshop Tutorials from 2010 and Collection of jQuery Tutorials from 2010, and they were greatly appreciated by our readers. Now it is time to showcase some wonderful free wordpress themes that we saw in 2010.

In this post, we have compiled some of the best wordpress themes that have been released in 2010, finding some amazing and free to use wordpress theme is like a cherry on the cake because you can redesign your blog with them and make you blog stand out from the rest.

Fotofolio Landscape

( Demo | Download )

Florance

( Demo | Download )

DarkSky wp theme

( Demo | Download )

Katana

( Demo | Download )

Jocasta

( Demo | Download )

Portfolio Plus Theme

( Demo | Download )

Free WordPress Theme for Coffee Blog

( Demo | Download )

DesignPile

( Demo | Download )

Koi

( Demo | Download )

Kronos

( Demo | Download )

Calypso

( Demo | Download )

SkyLight

( Demo | Download )

Banedict

( Demo | Download )

Ink and wash

( Demo | Download )

Webfolio

( Demo | Download )

SimpleFolio

( Demo | Download )

Wise Business

( Demo | Download )

JournalCrunch

( Demo | Download )

SimploBlack

( Demo | Download )

Simplo

( Demo | Download )

Boldy

( Demo | Download )

Colorbold

( Demo | Download )

Imbalance

( Demo | Download )

Shaken and Stirred Theme

( Demo | Download )

AutoFocus

( Demo | Download )

Grungie wp theme

( Demo | Download )

RedTweet

( Demo | Download )

GreenMag

( Demo | Download )

Bigsquare

( Demo | Download )

MANSION

( Demo | Download )

Modernist: Free WordPress Theme with Focus on Typography

( Demo | Download )

Academica: Theme For Educational Websites

( Demo | Download )

FULLSCREEN

( Demo | Download )

Monokrome

( Demo | Download )

BlueBubble WordPress Theme

( Demo | Download )

Element

( Demo | Download )

Evander

( Demo | Download )

Freshblog

( Demo | Download )

Blue News

( Demo | Download )

Brave Zeenat

( Demo | Download )

Structure Theme

( Demo | Download )

DarkSky wp theme

( Demo | Download )

Suburbia

( Demo | Download )

Sight – Free WordPress Theme

( Demo | Download )

Argonoid

( Demo | Download )

Bleach Desu

( Demo | Download )

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October 25 2010

05:33

35 Colorful Web Designs to Inspire You

Yes, we do love Minimal and Super Clean Web Designs, but we also have “a thing” for Colorful Web Designs. Sometimes color can completely transform the look of a website. So in this selection we are presenting to you 35 examples of colorful web designs. From colorful backgrounds to typography, icons and texture, this is an inspiring collection. Enjoy.

Puma Running

Puma’s running shoe website.

colorful08

Walt

colorful28

Pixelslave

Hello. We’re Pixelslave. We believe in making every pixel matter.

colorful29

So1o

Solo, the beautiful new project management tool for the modern freelancer.

colorful01

Postmark

Postmark helps small and large apps deliver and track transactional email.

colorful02

Tricycle Inc

Tricycle provides focused merchandising and communications services to support Tryk products and programs.

colorful03

Nuevo

Nuevo Restaurant.

colorful04

Deconstruction Records

colorful05

Served

The Served sites bring you a steady supply of top quality creative work, with each site streaming fresh projects in specific categories(e.g. fashion, industrial design, photography…).

colorful06

Hugs for Monsters

Hugs for Monsters, the work of visual artist Joe Lifrieri.

colorful07

Daniela Lerchner

colorful09

Brand New Conference

A one-day event organized by UnderConsideration on the development of corporate and brand identity projects by some of today’s most active and influential practitioners from around the world.

colorful10

Flight of the Conchords

colorful11

The Beehive Market

The Beehive Market is a green lifestyle market Saturdays from 10am to 2pm in West Berkeley at 1701 San Pablo Ave (the parking lot at the Berkeley Adult School).

colorful12

Ryan Keiser

colorful13

Life.Lab

Life.lab is an innovative and exciting new building that caters specifically for small businesses.

colorful14

Thunderfuel

colorful15

zendesk

Web-based customer support software with elegant ticket management and a self-service customer community.

colorful16

River City Church

We believe church should be inviting, powerful, transformational, and “religion-free”.

colorful17

Juan Diego Velasco

colorful18

designfabrika

designfabrika – visual works factory

colorful19

Daguia Tortas Finas

colorful20

Multiways

Multiways E-Strategies.

colorful21

Cottonseed Oil Tour

Cottonseed oil is back on the culinary map. From coast to coast, America’s original vegetable oil is working its way back into fryers and reformulated recipes that call for zero trans and great flavor.

colorful22

a modern eden

Design-minded products and toddler apps were lacking, so we made our own.

colorful23

Feed the King

colorful24

eight hour day

Eight Hour Day is a design boutique, and we love what we do.

colorful25

Toasted Digital

colorful26

Red Tiki

Red Tiki is a team of experienced professionals working together for the love of the web and animation.

colorful27

Cassius

colorful30

Vivo Group

Vivo Group is an independently owned digital agency based in Brisbane, Australia.

colorful31

BildmachtPlus

As expert for image-driven media projects, BildmachtPlus offers a full-service department for interactive and new media.

colorful32

There

There: the floating studio.

colorful33

dribbble

colorful34

Le 28Thiers

Le 28Thiers Bar.

colorful35

Sources:

The CSS Awards
siteInspire

October 18 2010

05:36

25 Pink Web Designs to Inspire You

October is the National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and since pink is the color for breast cancer awareness, we decided to gather this selection to inspire you and also to show our respect for something so important: the 25th birthday of Breast Cancer Awareness, Education and Empowerment. Pink is a really beautiful color, so here you will see some inspiring examples of how to use it in web design. From vibrant pink backgrounds to light pink elements and typography, you will certainly get inspired.

MailChimp 5.3

MailChimp 5.3… free all over again.

pinksites23

odopod

We’re a digital agency. We help brands make new friends.

pinksites01

My City Lives

pinksites19

GoodBytes

Web design bureau.

pinksites02

Stack

Stack is a unique service that brings together the best independent English language magazines from around the world and delivers them direct to your home.

pinksites03

Digital Devotion

Digital Devotion is the online portfolio of Von Klaus Lehmann.

pinksites05

We Shoot Bottles

We are based in the UK and we shoot bottles! Our specialty is photographing bottles of any shape.

pinksites06

LizLance

For ten months, I have examined how mass media affects beauty, body image and femininity in young women in Nepal. Through my documentary research, I have sought to understand the ways mass media consumption has affected Nepal’s changing standards of beauty.

pinksites07

Solid Giant

We are a professional web design studio with over 7 years of experience designing stunning websites.

pinksites08

Remix Creative

Hi, I’m Nik and Remix is my graphic design studio. I have been a design professional for over 10 years now, coming up through the well trodden design agency route.

pinksites09

odopod

Hi, I’m Doug Menezes, Brazilian Art Director.

pinksites10

better in pink

My name is Maddie, Madeline, Maddiemad and sometimes Madster. I absolutely love designing.

pinksites11

tickled pink designz

Once Upon a Time… One woman decided that it was time to bring sexy back to the internet. Tabatha did just that by creating Tickled Pink Designz in 2004.

pinksites12

pulcopiyo

The pulcopiyo are some candy-malicious plush creatures dolls designed by Pulco Mayo.

pinksites13

Charuca

Charuca is the universe of characters created by me, Charuca Vargas.

pinksites14

Make Mine Pink

My name is Joyce Lucas — I am the founder of MakeMinePink.com. I am a web designer, graphic designer, amateur photographer, dreamer, and a champion of women in business.

pinksites15

Central Snowsports

We get you into the right ski gear, first time, on time.

pinksites16

served

The Served sites bring you a steady supply of top quality creative work, with each site streaming fresh projects in specific categories(e.g. fashion, industrial design, photography…).

pinksites17

Work Life Balance Centre

The Work Life Balance Centre was founded in 1991 to help those people whose lives are feeling out of control or out of balance.

pinksites19

Pasarea de Foc

The first community dance performance in Romania, Igor Stravinsky’s “Firebird”, was presented to the public in Bucharest and Sibiu, as part of the International Festival “George Enescu”, in September 2009.

pinksites20

Oslo Film Festival

pinksites21

MultiAdaptor

We design brand identity and communications with personality.

pinksites22

Public Class

Our days usually start of with a breakfast meeting. Going over the upcoming day while chewing on a bagel is a pleasant way to wake up as well as keeping on schedule. After that we get in our chairs, fire up the applications required for todays tasks and work toward delivering magic.

pinksites24

Snog Pure Frozen Yogurt

Snog is a truly healthy treat.

pinksites25

Hello Sour Sally

Welcome to the new way to go healthy.

pinksites26

Sources:

InspirationTime
siteInspire
The CSS Awards

October 05 2010

10:04

How do colors affect purchases?

When marketing new products it is crucial to consider that consumers place visual appearance and color above other factors such as sound, smell and texture. To learn more about color psychology and how it influences purchases, see our latest infographic. Read more: http://blog.kissmetrics.com/color-psychology/#ixzz11TeJD2d6

View and Vote


Tags: Color

October 03 2010

18:02

The Most Powerful Colors On The Internet

This is so interesting to me. Have you ever wondered what the most powerful colors on the Internet are? These are the colors that command attention, the ones that make you look twice, and the ones that increase your click through rate.

View and Vote


Tags: Color
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