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November 25 2013

07:30

July 09 2013

15:09

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

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A while back we posted a list of 8 Books Every Designer Should Read, and among those books was a book I believe is a “must read” for every designer: The Design of Everyday Things by Donald A. Norman. In my opinion the book wrote by Donald A. Norman should be mandatory reading in all design related classes because it shows us amazing examples of good and bad designs, besides explaining through psychology and cognitive science why people like some things and dislike other. Even though the book was published in 1988 (its first version) it is still a masterpiece. His explanations of understanding something to use it seamlessly are really nice.

Since I believe that to deliver better designs we need to understand how people think and what they expect from things, I really liked to read about all Donald’s concepts. It doesn’t matter if you are a web, graphic, product or package designer, you can certainly take some good information from the book.

After reading the book I started paying attention to “everyday things” designed in a simple and minimal way. Things as cutlery, pans, mugs, tables, chairs, etc. Things we know how to use and we know that they don’t need “extra elements or details” to work. Things we know that may be super simple and deliver the same result. This is why I had the idea to gather some everyday things beautifully designed to inspire you.

Here I will show you some examples of beautifully designed products. Products designed in a minimalist way that reinforce that something may be simple and still deliver what it is intent for. Certainly something we can apply to the web and much more. Enjoy.

Cutlery Series by Oji Masanori

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

Kaiko Cookware Series by Makoto Koizumi

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

Swing by Jan Kochański

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

Revolt chair by Ahrend

The Revolt chair was originally designed in 1953 by the Dutch industrial designer Friso Kramer and is a true design classic. This one is a model was reintroduced by Ahrend in 2004.

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

#3 chair by StudioGorm

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

Hedy collection by Hannah Morrow

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

NW3 speakers by Neue Werkstatt

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

Bulb Fiction by KiBiSi

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

The Design of Everyday Things, Keeping it Simple

February 09 2012

05:00

Creating Minimalist Designs Makes You a Better Designer

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The trend of using minimalist designs has been with us for a while now. It seems like every day major design blogs publish a new gallery of great designs. But do minimalist designs actually mean anything to a designer? Can you become a better web designer by going the minimalist way or is it just a fad?

Actually, I do believe that it is a fad. But at the same time I also believe that you can learn a lot from it and use it to improve your skills significantly.

First of all, minimalist designs are here not without a reason. After the dark age of the ’90s (the dark age of web design, that is) came the year 2000 along with many Flash animations, fancy Photoshop graphics, and all kinds of other clutter. So finally after 20 years of noise a time of calm has come, bringing us this whole minimalism. People simply had enough off all the sites that were impossible to grasp and extremely user-unfriendly.

Minimalist designs change all that and provide a new, friendly environment. There’s nothing else on minimalist websites except for the things that absolutely need to be there. There’s no clutter and no confusion. And the sites are easy to grasp within the first 2 seconds of looking at them.

That is, of course, when done right.

So how can web designers use the trend of minimalism to improve their skills, and how to actually design a minimalist site properly?

Focus attention on the main element

Trend of Minimalism

Minimalist designs have very little elements incorporated into them. There’s simply no place for clutter or anything that is not essential to the site’s goal.

This forces designers to choose just one main element that will be the focal point of the whole site.

What can be such an element? It all depends on the site’s goals, but just to give you an example, let’s say that you’re designing a site for a new online service of some kind.

In such a case the main element would probably be the signup form. Consisting of a button, some screenshots, and short copy. You know that you can’t include too many things because the design is meant to be minimalist, so you only have place for the essentials. This will force you to think twice on what is really important for the site and what can be omitted.

Good designers are not the ones who can fill a whole site with stuff, but those who know how to select only the few important elements and forget about the rest.

Get those few elements right

Obviously, minimalist designs incorporate only a handful of elements to convey their message and convince visitors to take action (whatever action it might be).

This forces web designers to get those few elements just right. When working on a minimalist design you can devote more attention to each individual element. You also know that these elements need to be the best they possibly can. Because if they’re not then they’re going to stand out (in a bad way), as there will be nothing to cover them up.

Minimalist design is not about creating a site with just a few elements for the sake of it, but about using the smallest number of elements possible to reach a certain goal. Every element has its purpose in a minimalist design.

You know that you’re doing a good job if there are no more element you can remove without affecting the site’s ability to reach its goals.

Getting everything pixel perfect

This is a strictly graphics-related thing. Minimalist designs have to look exceptionally good. And in order to achieve this you have to make all elements pixel perfect (or at least try to).

Remember, there’s nothing to cover up this one elements that’s not so good looking. Everything needs to be nice or else your main element won’t be the one that’s the most visible … the ugly duckling will.

Crafting minimalist designs teaches you how to be pixel perfect. In fact, there’s no other way of creating a great minimalist design than by doing just that (whatever it might mean to you – there’s no one definition of “pixel perfection”).

Working on your typography

Typography is yet another element of minimalist designs, and probably one of the most important ones.

Since there’s not much to show on a minimalist website the text becomes an element on its own. That’s why choosing the right font, size and decoration is so crucial.

This is an area often neglected by many web designers. In some cases, Arial seems to be perfect for everything, but for minimalist designs it rarely is. Choosing the right font takes time and teaches you the basic rules of typography.

Every minimalist website needs to make a striking impression in terms of typography. If you just choose some random fonts the design won’t make much sense and the visitors will see this. Well, they probably won’t be able to name it, but they will notice.

Learning to use whitespace

Trend of Minimalism

Whitespace is one of those things that only the more experienced designers are not afraid to use. Many beginners feel that every piece of HTML real estate needs to be occupied by something, while it’s not the case at all.

When you’re creating a more complex design you get tempted to use every possible piece of space and fill it with that one more element. While it might work in some cases, it surely won’t work for minimalist designs.

Whitespace is yet another crucial element for minimalist designs. The sole fact that a minimalist design uses only a handful of elements forces us to space them out evenly on the site. They can’t just simply be placed all in one place.

The skill of using whitespace is somewhat volatile for web designers. Creating minimalist designs makes you simply better at using it, and this comes handy in every possible piece of design work imaginable.

Standing behind your opinion

In other words, believing that the work you’ve done is the absolute best you could do.

Here’s what I mean. If you’re a freelancer you might be reluctant about delivering a simple design. You might feel that your client won’t be so eager to pay if there are only a handful of elements on the website, and if the form is rather simplistic.

By sticking to minimalism you’re making your skin thick, and you’re learning how to stand behind your designs and be able to explain what their values are.

This is not a strictly design-centered skill, but it’s surely helpful in your freelance career.

Besides, once you learn how to explain the value of minimalist designs to your clients you’ll end up understanding them more yourself. So it’s a win-win scenario.

10 Minimalist examples

What follows is a set of 10 really nice minimalist designs for inspiration.

madebysofa.com

Trend of Minimalism

cargocollective.com/christopherose

Trend of Minimalism

fellswoop.com

Trend of Minimalism

madewithlove.be

Trend of Minimalism

thepokerclock.com

Trend of Minimalism

eutelnet.biz

Trend of Minimalism

soulwire.co.uk/hello

Trend of Minimalism

rodrigogalindez.com

Trend of Minimalism

theconsult.com

Trend of Minimalism

epidemialab.it

Trend of Minimalism

What do you think about the whole minimalist design fad? Do you think it’ll stick for more than a couple of years? What will follow?

December 14 2011

06:06

A Showcase of Minimal Workstations to Inspire You

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The basic idea of minimalism that less is more can also be applied to your workstation, and the result is really inspiring. Clean, minimal and beautiful stations with exactly those things you need to work, nothing more, nothing less. The spaces are simple: desks, a nice chair, your computer and something to give the space a nice personality, it’s all about keeping the space clean, really inspiring.

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

Minimal Workstations

November 14 2011

14:30

September 23 2011

04:10

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

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Our minimalism tag is filled with eye candy images to help you get inspired remembering that old and wise premise “less is more.” To add content to our tag and to keep showing you good examples of minimal designs that work we decided to show some posters designed by Pedro Vidotto. Pedro is a Graphic Designer and Art Director originally from Brazil who is currently based in London. His background is in Advertising and he has five years of experience working in the industry. Here you will be able to see that quality is better than quantity in design.

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

Inspiration: Minimalist Posters

September 02 2011

12:13

August 04 2011

18:30
12:02

July 08 2011

18:59

July 04 2011

07:10

20 New Examples of Minimal Websites

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As we mentioned in our last showcase of minimal web designs back in May, minimal layouts are the new black and we are glad about that cause this way we can show you more and more new and inspiring minimal websites. Today we decided to gather a new list of fresh minimal websites to inspire our readers, so enjoy it and remember, less is more.

Pure – Minimal WordPress theme

minsites21

Assembly

minsites01

deladee

minsites02

us design studio

minsites03

Hocus Focus

minsites04

vnsaga

minsites05

Touchtech

minsites06

Aker Brydge

minsites07

Nizo

minsites08

Vonrosen

minsites09

weltunit

minsites10

Daily – Dustin Heerkens

minsites11

Studio Antwork

minsites12

François Deladerrière

minsites13

Grain & Gram

minsites14

Andfold Studio

minsites15

Ryan Todd

minsites16

Chance Graham

minsites17

Infinise

minsites18

Headlamp

minsites19

Fox Johnston

minsites20

Source:

The Best Designs
Minimal Sites

July 01 2011

13:14

June 30 2011

18:50

June 29 2011

12:10

June 27 2011

12:10

June 15 2011

15:00

May 09 2011

05:40

25 Fresh Examples of Minimalist Web Designs

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I believe that we can agree that minimal and clean websites are the new black. Every day people seem to be embracing more and more the idea of less is more. So we decided to gather a new list of minimal and clean websites to show you how designers are showcasing minimalism on websites. And here you will also see some use of color, showing that minimal does not mean colorless.

Craft – WordPress Portfolio Theme

minimal01

Plastical

minimal08

Girlfriend

minimal09

Bestwork

minimal04

Stephon Vernon Clarke

minimal10

Snagly

minimal11

Saville’s

minimal12

EEHarbor

minimal13

Adore You

minimal15

Barnt & Arnst

minimal16

Jon Montenegro

minimal17

Holger Huber

minimal18

Lundgren+Lindqvist

minimal19

Louise O’Reilly

minimal20

Ahrens

minimal21

Atlason

minimal22

Marlon Medau

minimal01

iPhone-icon

minimal02

Jeremy Gleave

minimal03

Core

minimal05

Logartis 2011

minimal06

Corpus

minimal07

P.A.P.

minimal23

Unfold

minimal24

Tinkering Monkey

minimal25

Source:

The Best Designs
siteInspire

May 06 2011

13:10

March 11 2011

10:00

The Secret Of Successful Minimal Font Usage

Minimal fonts can awesomely enhance any artwork if used properly. You can see more and more websites using minimal fonts in their designs. Personally I love the neat look of bold minimal font in a minimal design. In this article you’re going to find some tips together with stunning examples to learn more about minimal font usage in web design. While minimalism seems easy – it really isn’t,  it takes great skill to come up with something clean, professional and unique at the same time! Let’s jump into art of minimal fonts?

Bigger Is Better

Since minimal fonts are rather slight you’ll have to use bigger font sizes in order to make your text visible and easy to read. Try to avoid using a font size lower than 14 points. Big and bold minimal serif fonts usually look awesome in headers and plain backgrounds. Large minimal headlines add an interactive look and accent to  minimal designs.

Fajne-chlopaki-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

Fajne Chlopaki uses huge headlines in his website’s header. The site has a clean and minimal style and these large fonts add a creative look to, and complete, the design.

Contrast

If you’re using minimal fonts be sure not to lose contrast. Try to implement light fonts on a dark background or vice versa. Stronger contrast will make your text easier to read since minimal fonts tend to blend into the background if the contrast is to low. Strong contrast will also enhance the whole look and make the fonts really stand out.

Visual-box-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

The Visualbox site has a dark background and they’re using white fonts for titles. They’re also using a large font size so the text is very noticeable. These minimal style titles also add a little accent to the design.

Keep It Minimal

Minimal fonts are for minimal usage. They’re neat when used sparingly and in the right situation, though they can look unrefined and clash if you clutter them and use inappropriately. Minimal fonts won’t look good in visually heavy designs. Less is more – they will look great in minimal designs with a lot of white space and few details.

Goslingo-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

Oliver James Cosling’s portfolio has a clean and minimal look. He’s using a large minimal font for the title and a smaller one for navigation. These fonts look strong and neat and they complement the design excellently.

Limit Your Fonts

Different type of fonts tend to conflict with each other and create a mess within your design. It’s especially true when talking about minimal fonts. Accurate use of fonts can add the right flair and character to your design. Using a select few however will help maintain a consistent look. Two to three fonts is usually good, of course, you can use more however you’ll have to be careful that they don’t cause visual noise.

Adoreyou-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

Adoreyou is an excellent example of effective use of minimal fonts. The site itself is a consistent, well-designed minimal style website. They’re using one minimal font for navigation and another one for the titles. The fonts are perfectly implemented into the design, they’re suitable and engaging at the same time.

Examples

Below you’ll find some stunning examples of minimal font use in web design. Each example is unique so you can see how a wide range of minimal fonts can be used. Check out these examples to learn how to implement minimal fonts effectively.

1. Elactique Designs

Electique-designs-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

2. Impala Web Studio

Impala-studio-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

3. Josh Sender

Iosh-sender-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

4. Kenny Saunders

Kenny-saunders-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

5. Studio Luma

Studio-luma-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

5. Teixido

Teixido-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

6. My Favourite Thing

My-favourite-thing-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

7. Samweb

Samweb-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

8. Giles Revell

Giles-revell-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

9. Doublenaut

Doublenaut-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

10. Efingo

Efingo-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

Fonts

I’ve also collected some nifty, good-looking fonts for you to start enhancing your designs.

1. District Thin

Disctrict-thin-free-fonts-minimal-web-design

2. Tex Gyre Adventor

Tex-gyre-adventor-free-fonts-minimal-web-design

3. Cicle

Cicle-free-fonts-minimal-web-design

4. Sertig

Sertig-free-fonts-minimal-web-design


Minimal Fonts in Web Design: Tips and Inspiration

5. Yanone Kaffeesatz

Yanone-kaffeesatz-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

6. Hattori Hanzo

Hatorri-hanzo-free-fonts-minimal-web-design

7. Extravaganzza

Extravaganzza-free-fonts-minimal-web-design

8. Tuffy

Tuffy-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

9. Print Clearly

Print-clearly-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

10. Titillium

Titillium-minimal-fonts-use-web-design-tips

Conclusion

I hope you learned something new from these tips and found the examples useful. Remember that minimal fonts are mainly for minimal usage. Don’t exaggerate, though feel free to experiment and achieve new looks. Minimal fonts are subtle but they have a personality which can bring your designs to a whole new level.

February 08 2011

06:55

Minimalistic Designs of Consumer Products

Our lives are often inundated with countless things screaming for our attention: media, packaging, signs, the web etc. When we’re searching through the clutter trying to find which product to choose, it’s often magical when our eyes rest on a beautiful, clean, well designed piece. The Minimalist Effect in the Maximalist Market does just that. Created by Antrepo which is a multi-disciplinary design consultancy that derives their power from exciting and passionate design members who are actively contributing to the core of design. Antrepo takes several popular brands, creates a simple variation and a more simplified variation. The result is stunning, clean, simple and powerful. We can only hope that some of these brands embody these principles.

Corn Flakes

cornflakes

Durex

durex

Lindt

lindt

Mr Musclemrmuscle

Nesquik

NesquikNutella

nutellaPringles

pringles

Red BullredbullSchweppes

SchweppesToffifee

toffifee

Antrepo

Site: Antrepo4.com

Blog: A2591.com

Twitter: @Antrepo

Facebook: Antrepo

Sponsored by

Made By Tinder

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Fuel Brand Network 2010 cc (creative commons license)



Minimalistic Designs of Consumer Products

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